Green milestone for Volvo Bus

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Following the introduction of Volvo Buses’ first hybrid buses in 2010, sales have increased steadily at the same time as the product range has undergone continuous development and expansion.

Today Volvo offers comprehensive system solutions for electrified public transport with hybrid buses, electric hybrids, and all-electric buses. The hybrid models are available in conventional 12m configuration, as articulated models, and as double-deckers. In 2016, Volvo sold 533 electrified buses, encompassing hybrids, electric hybrids, and all-electric buses.

The largest single market for Volvo’s hybrid buses thus far is the UK, which accounts for almost half (1,425) of the total of 3000 sales. Other major markets are Colombia (468), Sweden (196), Spain (137), Germany (135), Switzerland (129) and Norway (109). Over the past two years, demand has also increased in eastern Europe, with a healthy sales trend in Estonia (44) and Poland (48).

Volvo’s hybrid buses are powered by electricity when moving off and when standing still at bus stops. Otherwise they are propelled by their diesel engines. They are equipped with batteries, an electric motor and a small diesel engine. The batteries are charged during engine braking and the bus requires no external recharging infrastructure. They’re up to 39% more energy-efficient than a corresponding diesel bus.

The electric hybrids are propelled by electricity for most of the time. They are equipped with batteries, an electric motor and a small diesel engine. The batteries are charged both during engine braking and through fast-acting opportunity charging at either end of the bus route. They’re up to 60% more energy-efficient than a corresponding diesel bus.

Powered entirely by electricity, the electric buses have a battery pack and an electric motor. The batteries are charged during engine braking and through fast-acting opportunity charging at either end of the bus route. They’re up to 80% more energy-efficient than a corresponding diesel bus.